Tag Archive: Paul Mulshine

Conservative Mulshine Calls Iraq War “Greatest Strategic Mistake in US History”

promoted by Rosi

Star Ledger columnist Paul Mulshine has a piece calling on the US and Britain to address home grown Islamic extremism.

In it, he calls the Iraq war the greatest strategic mistake in US history:

That opportunity [for US citizens to join ISIS] was created by the greatest strategic mistake in U.S. history, the use of American military force to remove dictatorships in the Mideast under the mistaken theory that, given the vote, the citizens of those states would set up governments that have the best interests of the Western democracies at heart.

Mulshine is a conservative commentator, and so this is pretty strong. He’s also willing to take on other conservatives, so it’s not quite as strong as, say, Mary Cheney or Ron Paul saying it.

Legislatin’ Lawyers and the Columnists Who Love ‘Em

I did you a favor and read Paul Mulshine so you don’t have to (oh, lighten up already! I kid because I love…):

Christie then went on to mention another perk that the legislators grant themselves: Time off with pay from public jobs when they’re in Trenton.

“People in the private sector are not getting that benefit, so I don’t know why people in the public sector should,” Christie said.

Neither do most people, I suspect. And if I were one of the legislators taking advantage of this loophole, I’d hope the issue would just go away before anyone asked me about it.

Crazy Uncle Paul, off on one of his anti-public employee jihads, blasts House Speaker Sheila Oliver for working in the Essex County administration at a salary of $83,047. Paul, I know you specialize in resentment toward high five-figure salaries for public servants, but I think even you would admit that Oliver’s salary is hardly a king’s ransom.

Mulshine conveniently forgets, however, to mention Assemblywoman Celeste Riley, who rakes in a whopping $50,774 as a teacher in Greenwich Township. Wow – call Robin Leach…

The fact is that middle-class public servants like Riley would never be able to serve in the Legislature were it not for this law. Are people like Nick Sacco abusing it? Yes, of course, and that needs to stop. But conflating  Riley and Sacco is absurd.

Crazy Uncle Paul, however, goes a step further: he contrasts the “greed” of the legislator who is a public-employee with the “virtue” of the legislator who works in the public sector:

There are a couple of dentists in the Legislature, but so far neither has pushed to have the statute extended to oral surgery.

“When I leave my dental office, none of those patients want to pay me when I go to the Legislature,” said state Sen. Gerry Cardinale, a Republican from Bergen County. “I never had anyone say, ‘You don’t have to do my fillings but I’ll pay you anyway.'”

The same goes for accountants, he said.

“That accountant is not getting paid for the time he spends in the Legislature, but Sheila Oliver is getting paid for it,” he said. “For all of us who are employed in the private sector, it’s a sacrifice to serve in the Legislature.”

But when it comes to the public employees, all the sacrifice is on the taxpayer’s side.

Really? It’s a “sacrifice” for private sector employees to serve in the Legislature? Is it a sacrifce for, say, Senator James W. Holzapfel (R), the Senior Managing Partner at the law form of Citta, Holzapfel, & Zabarsky? It sure didn’t sound like a “sacrifice” in this 2007 profile of the senator:

The Love of My Life is a “Clueless Liberal”

707get-off-my-lawn

Usually I try not to engage the get off my lawn! folks. Partly that is because history has taught me how boring, how sometimes troubling those conversations can be. Part of it, dude, is that I live in Hunterdon. I am surrounded. I swim in the blood-red soup of the county that delivered Chris Christie his highest-percentage victory (eat my dust, Ocean County). I have friends and neighbors who define, promote and fund the other side. I reserve my politics for direct organizing, and for the homeblog and other writing.

Some of the friendly faces around me would cheerfully step in the way of a woman walking into an abortion provider, or write a check to somebody advocating murdering one. Some of them would cheerfully send my adorable little cousin, the brand new National Guardsman, to a pointless war for oil in some roughneck part of the world that would get her killed.

I live in Hunterdon, which means I talk politics all the time with people I don’t agree much with (though, more than they think, sometimes). I’m endlessly interested in the opinions of people with dramatically different worldviews. But I don’t much care what snarly dogs have to scream about.

And that brings me to Paul Mulshine. Mulshine, in a column under his byline for Star-Ledger Sunday, called the love of my life, Joey Novick, a “clueless liberal”. I thought all week about letting that go. What Paul Mulshine thinks, or very often appears not to think, about anything doesn’t matter much to me. Mulshine seems pretty interested in Blue Jersey, which is fine with me. His opinions are predictably harsh –  he likes to call us ignorant, amateurs and neophytes full of class envy, saddled with shocking ignorance. Boo boo boo. I couldn’t care less, except that when we’ve had to express substantial criticism of Mulshine’s colleague Tom Moran, like we did here for example it’s impossible not to remind Moran that we go a lot easier on him (and with more cogent arguments) than Mulshine does on us (so much Mulshinola, still the best thing I’ve read on the man).

But as to replying directly to Mulshine? Feh. I can’t see the point. Man’s stock in trade is to be grumpy, a crank. Get off my lawn!. That doesn’t interest me much.

But this week, he called Joey Novick – my family – a “clueless liberal”. And what was Joey’s crime in Paul Mulshine’s tilted world? Well, Joey sat down and conducted a nearly 40 minute videotaped interview with Assemblyman Michael Patrick Carroll for Blue Jersey, with our Deciminyan behind the camera. MPC’s worldview is very different from mine, probably from yours, from Deciminyan’s and from Joey’s. Believe me. But Joey is endlessly fascinated with conservatives and libertarians, how they became activated to the way they think, the spark to their ideas. And you know something? If you only talk to people who already agree with everything you think, who dress like you, vote like you, greet each other with the same secret handshake and talk in pre-approved  codes, you’ll live a very comfortable life. But you won’t necessarily learn how to craft a great argument or persuade anybody of anything, ever. And Joey’s about what makes people tick.

Joey likes to find the bedrock ethics of some of the people on the right, and use their own assumptions of the world to show them the world a way they might not have thought of. Sometimes that works, sometimes it doesn’t. Sometimes the right-wingers are trying to work their own voodoo on him (he remains my true blue). But it’s interesting.

Joey’s known Michael Patrick Carroll for several years; they’re friendly. And I have to say, the assemblyman couldn’t have been more gracious and welcoming to his lefty interviewer and videographer (this whole deal was Deciminyan’s idea – I give him big credit). We appreciated his willingness (even though some of our own readers thought we’d gone around the bend, or were kidding that we let MPC into the clubhouse).

Believe it or not, Joey’s friendly with Mulshine too, and Mulshine’s insults this week just roll right off his back (not mine). Some other pretty well-known conservatives too, on both the state and national level, Joey knows. He’s an interesting guy. Liberal, but not the way Mulshine means it (pond scum). But Joey’s nobody’s “clueless” anything.

Have a nice day, Paul Mulshine. And get off your own lawn.  

The Love of My Life is a “Clueless Liberal”

707get-off-my-lawn

Usually I try not to engage the get off my lawn! folks. Partly that is because history has taught me how boring, how sometimes troubling those conversations can be. Part of it, dude, is that I live in Hunterdon. I am surrounded. I swim in the blood-red soup of the county that delivered Chris Christie his highest-percentage victory (eat my dust, Ocean County). I have friends and neighbors who define, promote and fund the other side. I reserve my politics for direct organizing, and for the homeblog and other writing.

Some of the friendly faces around me would cheerfully step in the way of a woman walking into an abortion provider, or write a check to somebody advocating murdering one. Some of them would cheerfully send my adorable little cousin, the brand new National Guardsman, to a pointless war for oil in some roughneck part of the world that would get her killed.

I live in Hunterdon, which means I talk politics all the time with people I don’t agree much with (though, more than they think, sometimes). I’m endlessly interested in the opinions of people with dramatically different worldviews. But I don’t much care what snarly dogs have to scream about.

And that brings me to Paul Mulshine. Mulshine, in a column under his byline for Star-Ledger Sunday, called the love of my life, Joey Novick, a “clueless liberal”. I thought all week about letting that go. What Paul Mulshine thinks, or very often appears not to think, about anything doesn’t matter much to me. Mulshine seems pretty interested in Blue Jersey, which is fine with me. His opinions are predictably harsh –  he likes to call us ignorant, amateurs and neophytes full of class envy, saddled with shocking ignorance. Boo boo boo. I couldn’t care less, except that when we’ve had to express substantial criticism of Mulshine’s colleague Tom Moran, like we did here for example it’s impossible not to remind Moran that we go a lot easier on him (and with more cogent arguments) than Mulshine does on us (so much Mulshinola, still the best thing I’ve read on the man).

But as to replying directly to Mulshine? Feh. I can’t see the point. Man’s stock in trade is to be grumpy, a crank. Get off my lawn!. That doesn’t interest me much.

But this week, he called Joey Novick – my family – a “clueless liberal”. And what was Joey’s crime in Paul Mulshine’s tilted world? Well, Joey sat down and conducted a nearly 40 minute videotaped interview with Assemblyman Michael Patrick Carroll for Blue Jersey, with our Deciminyan behind the camera. MPC’s worldview is very different from mine, probably from yours, from Deciminyan’s and from Joey’s. Believe me. But Joey is endlessly fascinated with conservatives and libertarians, how they became activated to the way they think, the spark to their ideas. And you know something? If you only talk to people who already agree with everything you think, who dress like you, vote like you, greet each other with the same secret handshake and talk in pre-approved  codes, you’ll live a very comfortable life. But you won’t necessarily learn how to craft a great argument or persuade anybody of anything, ever. And Joey’s about what makes people tick.

Joey likes to find the bedrock ethics of some of the people on the right, and use their own assumptions of the world to show them the world a way they might not have thought of. Sometimes that works, sometimes it doesn’t. Sometimes the right-wingers are trying to work their own voodoo on him (he remains my true blue). But it’s interesting.

Joey’s known Michael Patrick Carroll for several years; they’re friendly. And I have to say, the assemblyman couldn’t have been more gracious and welcoming to his lefty interviewer and videographer (this whole deal was Deciminyan’s idea – I give him big credit). We appreciated his willingness (even though some of our own readers thought we’d gone around the bend, or were kidding that we let MPC into the clubhouse).

Believe it or not, Joey’s friendly with Mulshine too, and Mulshine’s insults this week just roll right off his back (not mine). Some other pretty well-known conservatives too, on both the state and national level, Joey knows. He’s an interesting guy. Liberal, but not the way Mulshine means it (pond scum). But Joey’s nobody’s “clueless” anything.

Have a nice day, Paul Mulshine. And get off your own lawn.  

TParty food fight (at each other)

Star-Ledger columnist Paul Mulshine has ended his neutrality and chosen sides in the ongoing war between various tea party groups and their respective supportive bloggers on the internet.

Now it’s gotten to the point where TParty standard bearers like Steve Lonegan are getting hit by stray pies in the escalating political food fight. A real casualty is uberwingnut Mike Doherty, who may have some cracks in his base to take on Joe Kyrillos for US Senate next year. If Doherty has any realistic chance to beat Kyrillos he needs the TNuts totally united behind his candidacy, and right now that’as not happening.    

Mulshinola

In today’s world, there are many types of journalists. Some, like me, are amateurs. Often referred to as “citizen-journalists”, we write because we love doing it. We don’t get paid, we typically have no formal journalism training, and we make rookie mistakes. In another category, despite the demise of the traditional news industry, there are professional journalists. They ply their craft to make a living, usually are graduates of respected journalism schools, and being human, they too often make mistakes. All journalists should be held to a high standard of ethics and integrity, and many citizen-journalists and most professional journalists write with those standards in mind.

It must be nice to always be blameless

As far back as when then US-Attorney Chris Christie was pulling rank for going down a one way street the wrong way and causing an accident, it was never his fault.  In that instance, it was the biker who hit him, which is a metaphor for everything that “just happens” when it comes to Christie.

The “admitting a mistake is a sign of weakness” view is really one that has a much more sinister meaning.  It shows a fatal flaw – one that was shown by Christie’s mentor, George W. Bush – in that one is never wrong, even when they are wrong, and is too immature to ever take responsibility for one’s own actions.

We have seen it with the Race to the Top Application that Christie hijacked, changed and ended up costing the state $400 million.  That wasn’t his fault – it was Obama’s, then others in the federal government, then Bret Schundler’s – but never his, despite the fact that the application that was to have been submitted before Christie got his hands on it had the correct information.

When it came to killing the ARC tunnel project, Christie blamed it on his wife after it surfaced that not only was the project on budget through August, but Christie knew this at the time he said that it would run over budget by billions.  Instead of facing up to being called on yet another lie, the story changed.

And of course now, when he left for Disney World as a horrible snowstorm was crippling much of the state he is supposed to govern, he blames his wife (“you better not cancel this vacation”), the mayors in the towns that were snowed in – forgetting the fact that the STATE roads were the ones that were decimated, and anyone who dared to criticize his decision as partisan.  Except that (1) it was bipartisan criticism and (2) he lied again – saying that he was in contact with acting Governor Steve Sweeney, when this too was  denied by Sweeney himself.

This, from the person who talks tough about accountability when it comes to other people’s actions.  But when it is for himself, , he has long since lost the benefit of the doubt.