Tag Archive: Philadelphia

New Jersey Democrats set 2016 Democratic National Convention delegate selection plan

The New Jersey Democratic State Committee has approved their delegate selection plan for the 2016 Democratic National Convention in South Jersey’s backyard of Philadelphia next July 25-28. This follows a 30-day public comment period that ended recently.

New Jersey is allotted 126 delegates total, plus 9 alternates. More than half this number will be apportioned to districts proportionally based on party registration, census population and previous election results. And those delegates will be divided among Democratic presidential candidates based on New Jersey’s primary election Jun 7, 2016.

Some of the delegate slots go to party leaders and elected officials, including state Chair John Currie and Vice-Chair Lizette Delgado-Polanco, members of Congress, NJ’s DNC members, and legislative leadership.

The Party has adopted specific goals (not quotas) for historically under-represented groups, including African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, women, members of the LGBT community, people with disabilities, and youth. Half the state’s delegation to the Convention must be women, per DNC rules. This is a party that intends its delegates to reflect the diversity of the country, unlike the Republicans, who have sometimes strained to look like the bigger-tent party the Democrats already are. I’m looking at you, South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham.

We don’t have the final document yet, it’s under review at the DNC. But below is the draft sent to Washington. On the jump page – this is what New Jersey’s delegation will look like:  

Quote of the Day: a “fight for the soul of news gathering”

This morning, as the drama went down in Philadelphia – which made national news – we were both tracking the blow-by-blow via reporter tweets, and emailing/texting with friends of Blue Jersey’s in the Inky newsroom, where distrust of the Norcross ownership went deep among journalists and created a challenge to editorial independence and the ability of their newsroom to function well. I pointed out that Norcross made a killing on the papers, which I bet stung the flailing Star-Ledger and challenges the idea of Norcross as the “loser” today. This is how one of our friends at the Inky responded:

Yes Norcross won $27 million but we’re rid of him. This was a fight for the soul of news gathering in this region. Our editorial talked today talked about how we could not endorse in one of the NJ House races because of our conflict of interest with Norcross’s brother being a candidate. The Inquirer is the largest circulating paper in South Jersey and we couldn’t weigh in on an important House race involving the brother of a boss who was given the seat as if we are no longer living in a democracy. I am ashamed of that. Ignoring the news is just as bad as slanting it. So if $27 million bought these over-worked, highly-committed people here their freedom, it was worth it.

                         – one of our sources in the Inky newsroom, today

This was the editorial today our friend meant, in which the paper failed to take a public position in CD1, where South Jersey Dems under big bro George rushed to endorse little bro Don even as Rob Andrews was speaking the words of his resignation from Congress. But the paper had to ignore that that happened, at least up front. Because that’s the way it goes down there, and the same guy running the politics and owning the means of communication was always a potential problem. The paper’s problems aren’t over, but we’ve got some journalist friends celebrating tonight. Here’s to them.

Photo: New owners Katz & Lenfest talk to staff just after the sale, by Philadelphia Inquirer reporter Angelo Fichera via Twitter.

OK, We Get It

Congratulations to the Philadelphia Inquirer for winning a Pulitzer Prize on a series about violence in the schools. But enough is enough. Their self-promotion is over the top. Not only did they choose to write about it in a lead story with a gazillion point headline font, but their lead editorial the next day touted their prize. And every day this week, they had full-page self-congratulatory ads in the paper.

The Inky is moving into new quarters soon. Will they top off the building with a statue of their owner, George Norcross III, to rival the iconic rendition of Billy Penn atop City Hall?