Author Archive: joeynovick

Bryant Conviction Upheld

New Jersey has enough corruption cases to fill headlines everyday.

But in case you’re interested: This week rejected Wayne Bryant’s appeal of his conviction on mail fraud and bribery.

So, the system does work.

For those of you who need a refresher, or cannot wait for the publication of “The Soprano State: The Sequel”: Waaay back in 2008, Bryant was paid by University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in Camden for a “low show” job as a ‘thank you’ for Bryant maneuvering millions in state funds to the school.

Bryant served as Chairman of the Senate’s Budget and Appropriations Committee back then.

And if a “low-show” job was not enough, the trial court determined that Bryant also had a “no-show” job to help pump up his pension benefits, this one for the Gloucester County Board of Social Services.

New Jersey math: One “low-show job” + One “no-show job” prison time.

But, Bryant appealed that NJ math result, arguing “that prosecutors violated their due process rights by interfering with their pretrial access to potential witnesses…and that the jury instructions were defective.”

The Third Circuit judges rejected Bryant’s appeal, and he stays put in federal prison.

So, it goes.  

Bryant Conviction Upheld

New Jersey has enough corruption cases to fill headlines everyday.

But in case you’re interested: The Third US Circuit Court of Appeals this week rejected Wayne Bryant’s appeal of his conviction on mail fraud and bribery.

So, the system does work.

For those of you who need a refresher, or cannot wait for the publication of “The Soprano State: The Sequel”: Waaay back in 2008, Bryant was paid by University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in Camden for a “low show” job as a ‘thank you’ for Bryant maneuvering millions in state funds to the school.

Bryant served as Chairman of the Senate’s Budget and Appropriations Committee back then.

And if a “low-show” job was not enough, the trial court determined that Bryant also had a “no-show” job to help pump up his pension benefits, this one for the Gloucester County Board of Social Services.

New Jersey math: One “low-show job” + One “no-show job” prison time.

But, Bryant appealed that NJ math result, arguing “that prosecutors violated their due process rights by interfering with their pretrial access to potential witnesses…and that the jury instructions were defective.”

The Third Circuit judges rejected Bryant’s appeal, and he stays put in federal prison.

So, it goes.  

Bryant Conviction Upheld

New Jersey seems to have enough new corruption cases to fill headlines everyday.

But in case you’re interested: The Third US Circuit Court of Appeals this week rejected Wayne Bryant’s appeal of his conviction on mail fraud and bribery.

So, the system does work.

For those of you who need a refresher, or cannot wait for the publication of “The Soprano State: The Sequel”: Waaay back in 2008, Bryant was paid by University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in Camden for a “low show” job as a ‘thank you’ for Bryant maneuvering millions in state funds to the school.

Bryant served as Chairman of the Senate’s Budget and Appropriations Committee back then.

And if a “low-show” job was not enough, the trial court determined that Bryant also had a “no-show” job to help pump up his pension benefits, this one for the Gloucester County Board of Social Services.

New Jersey math: One “low-show job” + One “no-show job” prison time.

But, Bryant appealed that NJ math result, arguing “that prosecutors violated their due process rights by interfering with their pretrial access to potential witnesses…and that the jury instructions were defective.”

The Third Circuit judges rejected Bryant’s appeal, and he stays put in federal prison.

So, it goes.  

Appeals Court Upholds Bryant Conviction

New Jersey seems to have enough new corruption cases to fill headlines everyday.

But in case you’re interested: The Third US Circuit Court of Appeals this week rejected Wayne Bryant’s appeal of his conviction on mail fraud and bribery.

So, the system does work.

For those of you who need a refresher, or cannot wait for the publication of “The Soprano State: The Sequel”: Waaay back in 2008, Bryant was paid by University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in Camden for a “low show” job as a ‘thank you’ for Bryant maneuvering millions in state funds to the school.

Bryant served as Chairman of the Senate’s Budget and Appropriations Committee back then.

And if a “low-show” job was not enough, the trial court determined that Bryant also had a “no-show” job to help pump up his pension benefits, this one for the Gloucester County Board of Social Services.

New Jersey math: One “low-show job” + One “no-show job” prison time.

But, Bryant appealed that NJ math result, arguing “that prosecutors violated their due process rights by interfering with their pretrial access to potential witnesses…and that the jury instructions were defective.”

The Third Circuit judges rejected Bryant’s appeal, and he stays put in federal prison.

So, it goes.  

Appeals Court Upholds Bryant Corruption Conviction

New Jersey seems to have enough new corruption cases to fill headlines everyday.

But in case you’re interested: The Third US Circuit Court of Appeals this week rejected Wayne Bryant’s appeal of his conviction on mail fraud and bribery.

So, the system does work.

For those of you who need a refresher, or cannot wait for the publication of “The Soprano State: The Sequel”: Waaay back in 2008, Bryant was paid by University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in Camden for a “low show” job as a ‘thank you’ for Bryant maneuvering millions in state funds to the school.

Bryant served as Chairman of the Senate’s Budget and Appropriations Committee back then.

And if a “low-show” job was not enough, the trial court determined that Bryant also had a “no-show” job to help pump up his pension benefits, this one for the Gloucester County Board of Social Services.

New Jersey math: One “low-show job” + One “no-show job” prison time.

But, Bryant appealed that NJ math result, arguing “that prosecutors violated their due process rights by interfering with their pretrial access to potential witnesses…and that the jury instructions were defective.”

The Third Circuit judges rejected Bryant’s appeal, and he stays put in federal prison.

So, it goes.  

From the ‘Just in case you’re interested file’: Appeals Court Upholds Bryant Corruption Conviction

New Jersey seems to have enough new corruption cases to fill headlines everyday.

But in case you’re interested: The Third US Circuit Court of Appeals this week rejected Wayne Bryant’s appeal of his conviction on mail fraud and bribery.

So, the system does work.

For those of you who need a refresher, or cannot wait for the publication of “The Soprano State: The Sequel”: Waaay back in 2008, Bryant was paid by University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in Camden for a “low show” job as a ‘thank you’ for Bryant maneuvering millions in state funds to the school.

Bryant served as Chairman of the Senate’s Budget and Appropriations Committee back then.

And if a “low-show” job was not enough, the trial court determined that Bryant also had a “no-show” job to help pump up his pension benefits, this one for the Gloucester County Board of Social Services.

New Jersey math: One “low-show job” + One “no-show job” prison time.

But, Bryant appealed that NJ math result, arguing “that prosecutors violated their due process rights by interfering with their pretrial access to potential witnesses…and that the jury instructions were defective.”

The Third Circuit judges rejected Bryant’s appeal, and he stays put in federal prison.

So, it goes.  

Sun Shines On NJSLOM: NJ Supremes Rule Powerful State League Subject To OPRA

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Each year the annual conference of the New Jersey State League of Municipalities (NJSLOM) is held in AC—always held in November after elections and before Thanksgiving. This is the largest annual gathering of state elected officials in the country. And until yesterday, NJSLOM could operate in relative secrecy from public scrutiny.

But, no more.

Yesterday, the NJ Supremes ruled unanimously that NJSLOM is “a public agency whose records are subject to disclosure”, in a opinion written by Justice Barry Albin.

Governing.Com makes this National News: Governor Christie admits Man Made Climate Change is Real.

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In a sharp rebuke to the Tea Party/Right-Wing/Global Warming-is-not-real-crowd, Christie admitted last week that “climate change is real”, and that “human activity plays a role in these changes” and that climate change is “impacting our state”.

It is quite amazing, that Governing.com actually thought the fact that a Republican Governor with (not-so-secret) aspirations for national office who now believes what the rest of ThinkingAmerica™ believes, is somehow national news.

Sad, if you really think about it.

And the governor has evolved on this issue, apparently. Last year, he told a town hall audience in Toms River he was skeptical climate change is the result of human activity.

BTW, not one of the Republican candidates for President (except for Jon Huntsman, apparently) believes that man-made climate change is real. Really.

So, to recap, what makes this national news, is that the Governor of a large industrial state on the east coast—a state where for years science and industry have worked hand in hand with the government in a realistic approach to the problems of man-made climate change—NOW believes it’s a real issue.

What’s the next headline?

“Christie believes in gravity, because he’s not floating off into space.”

“Christie believes in evolution because he took the family to see Rise Of The Planet of the Apes.”

Unbelievable.

Tea Party and MoveOn.Org: Perfect Together?

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Leonard Lance at Tea Party event Aug. 10, 2011

Last night, I attended a town meeting hosted by the Morris County Tea Party, featuring Congressman Leonard Lance. Yup, I was in the room with Tea Party People–and I survived.  You should try it yourself –it was a lot of fun.

Not only was I there, but nearly half the room was filled with MoveOn.org folks.  Strangely enough, but for widely different reasons, these folks agreed on one thing: they were both upset with Congressman Lance’s yes vote on the debt ceiling deal. One side thought it went way too far; the other side thought it went not far enough.

After a moment of silence for the 31 Navy SEALs who lost their lives last weekend, Lance began his presentation with a PowerPoint display explaining the debt ceiling deal:  How the agreement was to appoint a super committee of 12 members of Congress, six Democrats, six Republicans, six senators and six congressmen. This super committee would be charged with making suggestions of over $1 trillion in cuts by January of 2012.    If, however, this super committee cannot come to an agreement on cuts, then there would be a series of draconian cuts to everything including military spending.  This seems to be the sword of Damocles hanging over the heads of the conservative Republicans to at least try to be reasonable, and come to a good decision about cuts.

After Lance’s presentation, questions came from the standing room only crowd of almost 250. I must say that I was very impressed that the congressman took an equal number of questions from both tea party members and MoveOn.org members–I did not expect that to happen –considering that this was a Morris County Tea Party sponsored event.

 

E-Mail Discussion on Ordinance Found To Violate Open Public Meetings Act

 In 1976, there was no such thing as e-mail, the “inter-webs”, Facebook, texting or Twitter—when the Open Public Meetings Act (OPMA) was enacted by the New Jersey legislature. But don’t tell that to the Evesham council members who broke the law by carrying on an e-mail discussion about a proposed ordinance.

Burlington County Prosecutor Robert Bernardi found that council members and other town officials, (including solicitor John Gillespie), “inadvertently convened” a meeting with at least 14 messages sent during a 20-hour period that amounted to an “ongoing dialogue” taking place “in almost real time,” —-with some e-mails just a few minutes apart.

OPMA makes sure that the People are aware of the People’s business—whether done in person or virtually over the internet. Thanks, County Prosecutor Bernardi for keeping things honest and open in Burlington. You can see the NJ Law Review article here.