News Roundup & Open Thread for Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012


  • What some of your Jersey neighbors went through – to vote.

    “As the only professional theater organization in Camden, we need to tell Camden stories”

  • Community, race and politics – as theater. (Riordan)

    What do you think?

  • Cory Booker to decide soon whether he’ll challenge Chris Christie for Gov. seat.

    Where are the Women?

  • Who are the women who can effectively challenge incumbents – in either party?


  • Stile: Can Christie win back GOP’s favor?
  • Christie deflects heat that he cost Romney the election.
  • Shoots down question at press conference.
  • The Atlantic: Christie backlash machine revs into high gear.
  • Conservatives blaming Christie for Romney’s loss.
  • Rips Romney staffers, who he says questioned his loyalty to GOP ticket.

    Weinberg: “I still don’t believe we should put civil rights onto a referendum”

  • N.J. gay rights advocates aren’t looking to put marriage up to vote.
  • Star-Ledger editorial: Time for N.J. to vote on gay marriage.

    No blue state stuck by Obama like New Jersey

  • Jackson: NJ the only state in the country where Obama won 4 years ago and garnered even more support this year.

    House Races

  • Incumbency and money.

    The vote

  • Election officials have no answers yet on how emergency voting plans worked.
  • GCN: N.J. voting extension exposes email can of worms.


  • N.J. sees record-low voter turnout in wake of Hurricane Sandy.
  • Switch to November ballot boosts school-election turnout.
  • Jury still out on whether November school elections were a success in N.J..
  • Storm-delayed votes by hurricane victims, first-responders won’t be counted until tomorrow.


  • Moody’s maintains utility credit ratings, despite soaring restoration costs; Lower ratings could make it more expensive for utilities to borrow money, a cost ultimately passed on to ratepayers.

    Still cold, and looking at 10th day without electricity

  • With parts of Somerset County still in the dark, residents and officials demand answers.

  • Comments (3)

    1. Jay Lassiter

      I hear some legislators and leaders in the gay rights movement tell me this is a bad idea but so far none of them as given be a good reason why it’s a bad idea other than it welcomes sometimes hurtful and mean-spirited debate on the trail.

      Sure, I get it, it’s offensive to ask millions of people to ratify my equality.  That’s difficult to accept.  But if that’s the only compelling reason the LBGT community has to NOT do it, I’d say that’s pretty weak and timid.

      SO I remain open to the idea of a referendum on marriage equality in New Jersey.

    2. Bertin Lefkovic

      …is all but finished.  He could run for re-election as a Republican next year and probably win.  He might even be able to beat Bob Menendez six years from now.  But there is no way that he will be able to win the Republican Presidential nomination.

      So if Christie is satisfied with the idea of finishing out his term as Governor and then being a Senator for the rest of his political career, that is fine.  However, if there is anything that is bigger than he is, it is his ego, and I don’t think that he would be very happy in the Senate for very long.

      Thus, if he wanted to take the road less traveled, I think that he might consider running for re-election as a Democrat next year, in a grand merger with his Christiecratic allies, bringing along most of the Republicans in the Assembly, Senate, and House of Representatives with him, and then using the national attention that will come with this to align himself with New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and his billions of dollars to jumpstart the dormant Americans Elect/No Labels movement, becoming its first Presidential candidate and picking someone like Chuck Hagel to be his Vice President.

    3. Bertin Lefkovic

      Being straight, I have always deferred to LGBT leaders like Jeff Gardner and Steven Goldstein on this question, but if Tuesday’s results have changed the thinking on this question has changed, I would support efforts to win a referendum.

      That said, it may not be necessary.  I think that Christie’s nonpartisan governance during and since Sandy and the Republican reaction outside of NJ to it has all but put an end to his future as a Republican Presidential candidate.

      If Christie is smart enough to recognize this and decides to focus on re-election in the short term, good governance in the mid-term, and running for Senate against Bob Menendez in the long-term, he might reconsider some of the positions that he has taken over the last three years, starting with his veto of marriage equality legislation.

      In the spirit of post-Sandy kumbaya, Christie could talk about how Democrats and Republicans need to work together to rebuild our state going forward and how this would be easier to do if we could put some of the more contentious issues that have nothing to do with this effort behind us.

      As a gesture in this direction, he could say that while his position on the issue of marriage equality has not changed, he would encourage other Republicans who disagree with him on this issue to vote their consciences on an override and that he would not take it personally if his veto was overridden.

      If there is any chance of something like this happening, I would say that encouraging it in an organized way would make more sense than considering a referendum.  Maybe Steven could draft an open letter to the Governor to this effect, publish it on the GSE website, and get thousands of marriage equality supporters to co-sign.


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