Weekend (not exactly a) Poll: NJ Movies

For many people summertime is movie time, and there have been plenty of movies about New Jersey.  

We are not asking which is necessarily the “best” NJ movie. From a list of over 20 choices, select and vote for one and let us know why. It may be because it brings back a memory, typifies some aspect of NJ life, is evocative of  a period, a great film, an enjoyable comedy, or any other reason. And feel free to mention a movie not on the list.

Go beyond the fold to click on a film, tell us why you like it, and see what others are saying.  

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Weekend (not exactly a) Poll: NJ Movies

For many people summertime is movie time, and there have been plenty of movies about New Jersey.  

We are not asking which is necessarily the “best” NJ movie. From a list of over 20 choices, select and vote for one and let us know why. It may be because it bring back a memory, typifies some aspect of NJ life, is evocative of  a period, a great film, an enjoyable comedy, or any other reason. And feel free to mention a movie not on the list.

Go beyond the fold to click on a film, tell us why you like it, and see what others are saying.  

Comments (13)

  1. Bill Orr (Post author)

    A NJ way of life, funny, dumb and maybe existential.

    Reply
  2. carolh

    While On the Waterfront was the best film, and Garden State was endearing, Harold and Kumar best reflects what it is actually like to live here.  You never know who you will run into here or what on earth will happen next.  You just gotta go with it – because whatever happens, good or bad is usually pretty entertaining. And you will usually crave White Castles somewhere along the way, even though you will surely regret it nearly immediately after that last little cardboard box is empty….

    Reply
  3. Hopeful

    I used to always watch it if I ran across it on TV — sometimes two or three times in a weekend on TV. Why? I don’t know, though I like the music and the neo-noir story.

    (A few years ago, I tried to show the DVD to my wife and she said this is a terrible movie… and she likes crime movies and musicals.)

    Reply
  4. JackHarris

    Now that’s a true NJ story!  

    Reply
  5. JackHarris
    Reply
  6. robosz

    John Sayles mid-80’s film was co-written and produced by Amy Robinson from Trenton, and the story begins in Chambersburg in Trenton.

    The film of course has the TRENTON MAKES bridge, a reference to tomato pie, and a line that goes something like …”When I think about my life back in Trenton, it was like doing in time in prison…”  The story leaves NJ, but much of the narrative is about moving beyond and away from where you were born and who you were, and the trouble that brings on.  I thought that — like most of John Sayles’ film — this was a refreshingly genuine look at a specific time and a place.

    Reply
  7. ken bank

    I loved Kate Reid in Atlantic City. And Burt Lancaster’s line complaining about Howard Johnsons in the casino business was hilarious.

    All in all the best description of life in Atlantic City beneath all the corporate glitz and glamour. And it hasn’t changed one bit. Just a big pile of manure in a five star hotel.

    Reply
  8. mmgth

    Think I remember being taken to places like the movie’s restaurant somewhere down the shore when I was a little kid.  

    Reply
  9. mmgth

    Thought On The Waterfront was about working on the N. Y. docks.  

    Reply
  10. Nowlan

    Anybody see this in 1988? Can’t remember how good it was.  Frank Vincent has a supporting role–“Ima busy wit da bocce,” he says when his wife is on her deathbed.  Ah, maybe it’s not so great; but some of my friends were in it.  And the real star is Essex county.  

    http://www.nytimes.com/1988/01

    Reply
  11. Rosi Efthim

    Well, my friend Claudia Sherman is in Baby, It’s You. But that’s actually my least favorite John Sayles movie. So, not that.

    The World According to Garp – I don’t associate that with NJ, but with Long Island, where most of my favorite parts of the movie were shot.

    On the Waterfront – is my favorite film score (Leonard Bernstein), and my parents met Bernstein waiting on a long line out in the cold in NYC, when Bernstein came by and convinced them to stay and see the movie (he was right, it’s great). And I got to see it 2 summers ago in Hoboken on a beautiful, 40-foot outdoor screen with the Manhattan skyline and river as backdrop, at the exact spot where those docks were, and the movie was filme in what’s now Pier A Park. Sentimental favorite.

    Goodbye Columbus – way high in the pantheon.  

    Big Night –  has to be my pick. Mostly because I still remembered how I felt when I first saw it. It made me want to cook stuff and make little movies.  

    Reply

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